Chapter 32. Application Server Integration and Java EE

HornetQ can be easily installed in JBoss Application Server 4 or later. For details on installing HornetQ in the JBoss Application Server please refer to quick-start guide.

Since HornetQ also provides a JCA adapter, it is also possible to integrate HornetQ as a JMS provider in other JEE compliant app servers. For instructions on how to integrate a remote JCA adaptor into another application sever, please consult the other application server's instructions.

A JCA Adapter basically controls the inflow of messages to Message-Driven Beans (MDBs) and the outflow of messages sent from other JEE components, e.g. EJBs and Servlets.

This section explains the basics behind configuring the different JEE components in the AS.

32.1. Configuring Message-Driven Beans

The delivery of messages to an MDB using HornetQ is configured on the JCA Adapter via a configuration file ra.xml which can be found under the jms-ra.rar directory. By default this is configured to consume messages using an InVM connector from the instance of HornetQ running within the application server. The configuration properties are listed later in this chapter.

All MDBs however need to have the destination type and the destination configured. The following example shows how this can be done using annotations:

@MessageDriven(name = "MDBExample",
               activationConfig =
                     {
                        @ActivationConfigProperty(propertyName = "destinationType", propertyValue = "javax.jms.Queue"),
                        @ActivationConfigProperty(propertyName = "destination", propertyValue = "queue/testQueue")
                     })
@ResourceAdapter("hornetq-ra.rar")
public class MDBExample implements MessageListener
{
   public void onMessage(Message message)...
}

In this example you can see that the MDB will consume messages from a queue that is mapped into JNDI with the binding queue/testQueue. This queue must be preconfigured in the usual way using the HornetQ configuration files.

The ResourceAdapter annotation is used to specify which adaptor should be used. To use this you will need to import org.jboss.ejb3.annotation.ResourceAdapter for JBoss AS 5.X and later version which can be found in the jboss-ejb3-ext-api.jar which can be found in the JBoss repository. For JBoss AS 4.X, the annotation to use is org.jboss.annotation.ejb.ResourceAdaptor.

Alternatively you can add use a deployment descriptor and add something like the following to jboss.xml

<message-driven>
   <ejb-name>ExampleMDB</ejb-name>
   <resource-adapter-name>hornetq-ra.rar</resource-adapter-name>
</message-driven>

You can also rename the hornetq-ra.rar directory to jms-ra.rar and neither the annotation or the extra descriptor information will be needed. If you do this you will need to edit the jms-ds.xml datasource file and change rar-name element.

Note

HornetQ is the default JMS provider for JBoss AS 6. Starting with this AS version, HornetQ resource adapter is named jms-ra.rar and you no longer need to annotate the MDB for the resource adapter name.

All the examples shipped with the HornetQ distribution use the annotation.

32.1.1. Using Container-Managed Transactions

When an MDB is using Container-Managed Transactions (CMT), the delivery of the message is done within the scope of a JTA transaction. The commit or rollback of this transaction is controlled by the container itself. If the transaction is rolled back then the message delivery semantics will kick in (by default, it will try to redeliver the message up to 10 times before sending to a DLQ). Using annotations this would be configured as follows:

@MessageDriven(name = "MDB_CMP_TxRequiredExample",
               activationConfig =
                     {
                        @ActivationConfigProperty(propertyName = "destinationType", propertyValue = "javax.jms.Queue"),
                        @ActivationConfigProperty(propertyName = "destination", propertyValue = "queue/testQueue")
                     })
@TransactionManagement(value= TransactionManagementType.CONTAINER)
@TransactionAttribute(value= TransactionAttributeType.REQUIRED)
@ResourceAdapter("hornetq-ra.rar")
public class MDB_CMP_TxRequiredExample implements MessageListener
{
   public void onMessage(Message message)...
}

The TransactionManagement annotation tells the container to manage the transaction. The TransactionAttribute annotation tells the container that a JTA transaction is required for this MDB. Note that the only other valid value for this is TransactionAttributeType.NOT_SUPPORTED which tells the container that this MDB does not support JTA transactions and one should not be created.

It is also possible to inform the container that it must rollback the transaction by calling setRollbackOnly on the MessageDrivenContext. The code for this would look something like:

   @Resource
   MessageDrivenContextContext ctx;

   public void onMessage(Message message)
   {
      try
      {
         //something here fails
      }
      catch (Exception e)
      {
         ctx.setRollbackOnly();
      }
   }

If you do not want the overhead of an XA transaction being created every time but you would still like the message delivered within a transaction (i.e. you are only using a JMS resource) then you can configure the MDB to use a local transaction. This would be configured as such:

@MessageDriven(name = "MDB_CMP_TxLocalExample",
               activationConfig =
                     {
                           @ActivationConfigProperty(propertyName = "destinationType", propertyValue = "javax.jms.Queue"),
                           @ActivationConfigProperty(propertyName = "destination", propertyValue = "queue/testQueue"),
                           @ActivationConfigProperty(propertyName = "useLocalTx", propertyValue = "true")
                     })
@TransactionManagement(value = TransactionManagementType.CONTAINER)
@TransactionAttribute(value = TransactionAttributeType.NOT_SUPPORTED)
@ResourceAdapter("hornetq-ra.rar")
public class MDB_CMP_TxLocalExample implements MessageListener
{
   public void onMessage(Message message)...
}

32.1.2. Using Bean-Managed Transactions

Message-driven beans can also be configured to use Bean-Managed Transactions (BMT). In this case a User Transaction is created. This would be configured as follows:

@MessageDriven(name = "MDB_BMPExample",
               activationConfig =
                     {
                        @ActivationConfigProperty(propertyName = "destinationType", propertyValue = "javax.jms.Queue"),
                        @ActivationConfigProperty(propertyName = "destination", propertyValue = "queue/testQueue"),
                        @ActivationConfigProperty(propertyName = "acknowledgeMode", propertyValue = "Dups-ok-acknowledge")
                     })
@TransactionManagement(value= TransactionManagementType.BEAN)
@ResourceAdapter("hornetq-ra.rar")
public class MDB_BMPExample implements MessageListener
{
   public void onMessage(Message message)
}

When using Bean-Managed Transactions the message delivery to the MDB will occur outside the scope of the user transaction and use the acknowledge mode specified by the user with the acknowledgeMode property. There are only 2 acceptable values for this Auto-acknowledge and Dups-ok-acknowledge. Please note that because the message delivery is outside the scope of the transaction a failure within the MDB will not cause the message to be redelivered.

A user would control the lifecycle of the transaction something like the following:

   @Resource
   MessageDrivenContext ctx;

   public void onMessage(Message message)
   {
      UserTransaction tx;
      try
      {
         TextMessage textMessage = (TextMessage)message;

         String text = textMessage.getText();

         UserTransaction tx = ctx.getUserTransaction();

         tx.begin();
         
         //do some stuff within the transaction
         
         tx.commit();

      }
      catch (Exception e)
      {
         tx.rollback();
      }
   }

32.1.3. Using Message Selectors with Message-Driven Beans

It is also possible to use MDBs with message selectors. To do this simple define your message selector as follows:

@MessageDriven(name = "MDBMessageSelectorExample",
               activationConfig =
                     {
                        @ActivationConfigProperty(propertyName = "destinationType", propertyValue = "javax.jms.Queue"),
                        @ActivationConfigProperty(propertyName = "destination", propertyValue = "queue/testQueue"),
                        @ActivationConfigProperty(propertyName = "messageSelector", propertyValue = "color = 'RED'")
                     })
@TransactionManagement(value= TransactionManagementType.CONTAINER)
@TransactionAttribute(value= TransactionAttributeType.REQUIRED)
@ResourceAdapter("hornetq-ra.rar")
public class MDBMessageSelectorExample implements MessageListener
{
   public void onMessage(Message message)....
}

32.2. Sending Messages from within JEE components

The JCA adapter can also be used for sending messages. The Connection Factory to use is configured by default in the jms-ds.xml file and is mapped to java:/JmsXA. Using this from within a JEE component will mean that the sending of the message will be done as part of the JTA transaction being used by the component.

This means that if the sending of the message fails the overall transaction would rollback and the message be re-sent. Heres an example of this from within an MDB:

@MessageDriven(name = "MDBMessageSendTxExample",
               activationConfig =
                     {
                        @ActivationConfigProperty(propertyName = "destinationType", propertyValue = "javax.jms.Queue"),
                        @ActivationConfigProperty(propertyName = "destination", propertyValue = "queue/testQueue")
                     })
@TransactionManagement(value= TransactionManagementType.CONTAINER)
@TransactionAttribute(value= TransactionAttributeType.REQUIRED)
@ResourceAdapter("hornetq-ra.rar")
public class MDBMessageSendTxExample implements MessageListener
{
   @Resource(mappedName = "java:/JmsXA")
   ConnectionFactory connectionFactory;

   @Resource(mappedName = "queue/replyQueue")
   Queue replyQueue;

   public void onMessage(Message message)
   {
      Connection conn = null;
      try
      {
         //Step 9. We know the client is sending a text message so we cast
         TextMessage textMessage = (TextMessage)message;

         //Step 10. get the text from the message.
         String text = textMessage.getText();

         System.out.println("message " + text);

         conn = connectionFactory.createConnection();

         Session sess = conn.createSession(false, Session.AUTO_ACKNOWLEDGE);

         MessageProducer producer = sess.createProducer(replyQueue);

         producer.send(sess.createTextMessage("this is a reply"));

      }
      catch (Exception e)
      {
         e.printStackTrace();
      }
      finally
      {
         if(conn != null)
         {
            try
            {
               conn.close();
            }
            catch (JMSException e)
            { 
            }
         }
      }
   }
   }

In JBoss Application Server you can use the JMS JCA adapter for sending messages from EJBs (including Session, Entity and Message-Driven Beans), Servlets (including jsps) and custom MBeans.

32.3. MDB and Consumer pool size

Most application servers, including JBoss, allow you to configure how many MDB's there are in a pool. In Jboss this is configured via the MaxPoolSize parameter in the ejb3-interceptors-aop.xml file. Configuring this has no actual effect on how many sessions/consumers there actually are created. This is because the Resource Adaptor implementation knows nothing about the application servers MDB implementation. So even if you set the MDB pool size to 1, 15 sessions/consumers will be created (this is the default). If you want to limit how many sessions/consumers are created then you need to set the maxSession parameter either on the resource adapter itself or via an an Activation Config Property on the MDB itself

@MessageDriven(name = "MDBMessageSendTxExample",
               activationConfig =
                     {
                        @ActivationConfigProperty(propertyName = "destinationType", propertyValue = "javax.jms.Queue"),
                        @ActivationConfigProperty(propertyName = "destination", propertyValue = "queue/testQueue"),
                        @ActivationConfigProperty(propertyName = "maxSession", propertyValue = "1")
                     })
@TransactionManagement(value= TransactionManagementType.CONTAINER)
@TransactionAttribute(value= TransactionAttributeType.REQUIRED)
@ResourceAdapter("hornetq-ra.rar")
public class MyMDB implements MessageListener
{ ....}
      

32.4. Configuring the JCA Adaptor

The Java Connector Architecture (JCA) Adapter is what allows HornetQ to be integrated with JEE components such as MDBs and EJBs. It configures how components such as MDBs consume messages from the HornetQ server and also how components such as EJBs or Servlets can send messages.

The HornetQ JCA adapter is deployed via the jms-ra.rar archive. The configuration of the adapter is found in this archive under META-INF/ra.xml.

The configuration will look something like the following:

<resourceadapter>
      <resourceadapter-class>org.hornetq.ra.HornetQResourceAdapter</resourceadapter-class>
      <config-property>
         <description>The transport type</description>
         <config-property-name>ConnectorClassName</config-property-name>
         <config-property-type>java.lang.String</config-property-type>
         <config-property-value>org.hornetq.core.remoting.impl.invm.InVMConnectorFactory</config-property-value>
      </config-property>
      <config-property>
         <description>The transport configuration. These values must be in the form of key=val;key=val;</description>
         <config-property-name>ConnectionParameters</config-property-name>
         <config-property-type>java.lang.String</config-property-type>
         <config-property-value>server-id=0</config-property-value>
      </config-property>

      <outbound-resourceadapter>
         <connection-definition>
            <managedconnectionfactory-class>org.hornetq.ra.HornetQRAManagedConnection
            Factory</managedconnectionfactory-class>

            <config-property>
               <description>The default session type</description>
               <config-property-name>SessionDefaultType</config-property-name>
               <config-property-type>java.lang.String</config-property-type>
               <config-property-value>javax.jms.Queue</config-property-value>
            </config-property>
            <config-property>
               <description>Try to obtain a lock within specified number of seconds; less
               than or equal to 0 disable this functionality</description>
               <config-property-name>UseTryLock</config-property-name>
               <config-property-type>java.lang.Integer</config-property-type>
               <config-property-value>0</config-property-value>
            </config-property>

            <connectionfactory-interface>org.hornetq.ra.HornetQRAConnectionFactory
            </connectionfactory-interface>
            <connectionfactororg.hornetq.ra.HornetQConnectionFactoryImplonFactoryImpl
            </connectionfactory-impl-class>
            <connection-interface>javax.jms.Session</connection-interface>
            <connection-impl-class>org.hornetq.ra.HornetQRASession
            </connection-impl-class>
         </connection-definition>
         <transaction-support>XATransaction</transaction-support>
         <authentication-mechanism>
            <authentication-mechanism-type>BasicPassword
            </authentication-mechanism-type>
            <credential-interface>javax.resource.spi.security.PasswordCredential
            </credential-interface>
         </authentication-mechanism>
         <reauthentication-support>false</reauthentication-support>
      </outbound-resourceadapter>

      <inbound-resourceadapter>
         <messageadapter>
            <messagelistener>
               <messagelistener-type>javax.jms.MessageListener</messagelistener-type>
               <activationspec>
                  <activationspec-class>org.hornetq.ra.inflow.HornetQActivationSpec
                  </activationspec-class>
                  <required-config-property>
                      <config-property-name>destination</config-property-name>
                  </required-config-property>
               </activationspec>
            </messagelistener>
         </messageadapter>
      </inbound-resourceadapter>

   </resourceadapter>

There are three main parts to this configuration.

  1. A set of global properties for the adapter

  2. The configuration for the outbound part of the adapter. This is used for creating JMS resources within EE components.

  3. The configuration of the inbound part of the adapter. This is used for controlling the consumption of messages via MDBs.

32.4.1. Global Properties

The first element you see is resourceadapter-class which should be left unchanged. This is the HornetQ resource adapter class.

After that there is a list of configuration properties. This will be where most of the configuration is done. The first two properties configure the transport used by the adapter and the rest configure the connection factory itself.

Note

All connection factory properties will use the defaults if they are not provided, except for the reconnectAttempts which will default to -1. This signifies that the connection should attempt to reconnect on connection failure indefinitely. This is only used when the adapter is configured to connect to a remote server as an InVM connector can never fail.

The following table explains what each property is for.

Table 32.1. Global Configuration Properties

Property NameProperty TypeProperty Description
ConnectorClassNameStringThe Connector class name (see Chapter 16, Configuring the Transport for more information)
ConnectionParametersStringThe transport configuration. These parameters must be in the form of key1=val1;key2=val2; and will be specific to the connector used
useLocalTxbooleanTrue will enable local transaction optimisation.
UserNameStringThe user name to use when making a connection
PasswordStringThe password to use when making a connection
BackupConnectorClassNameStringThe backup transport to use in case of failure of the live node
BackupConnectionParametersStringThe backup transport configuration parameters
DiscoveryAddressStringThe discovery group address to use to autodetect a server
DiscoveryPortIntegerThe port to use for discovery
DiscoveryRefreshTimeoutLongThe timeout, in milliseconds, to refresh.
DiscoveryInitialWaitTimeout LongThe initial time to wait for discovery.
ConnectionLoadBalancingPolicyClassNameStringThe load balancing policy class to use.
ConnectionTTLLongThe time to live (in milliseconds) for the connection.
CallTimeoutLongthe call timeout (in milliseconds) for each packet sent.
DupsOKBatchSizeIntegerthe batch size (in bytes) between acknowledgements when using DUPS_OK_ACKNOWLEDGE mode

Continued..

TransactionBatchSizeIntegerthe batch size (in bytes) between acknowledgements when using a transactional session
ConsumerWindowSizeIntegerthe window size (in bytes) for consumer flow control
ConsumerMaxRateIntegerthe fastest rate a consumer may consume messages per second
ConfirmationWindowSizeIntegerthe window size (in bytes) for reattachment confirmations
ProducerMaxRateIntegerthe maximum rate of messages per second that can be sent
MinLargeMessageSizeIntegerthe size (in bytes) before a message is treated as large
BlockOnAcknowledgeBooleanwhether or not messages are acknowledged synchronously
BlockOnNonDurableSendBooleanwhether or not non-durable messages are sent synchronously
BlockOnDurableSendBooleanwhether or not durable messages are sent synchronously
AutoGroupBooleanwhether or not message grouping is automatically used
PreAcknowledgeBooleanwhether messages are pre acknowledged by the server before sending
ReconnectAttemptsIntegermaximum number of retry attempts, default for the resource adpater is -1 (infinite attempts)
RetryIntervalLongthe time (in milliseconds) to retry a connection after failing
RetryIntervalMultiplierDoublemultiplier to apply to successive retry intervals
FailoverOnServerShutdownBooleanIf true client will reconnect to another server if available
ClientIDStringthe pre-configured client ID for the connection factory
ClientFailureCheckPeriodLongthe period (in ms) after which the client will consider the connection failed after not receiving packets from the server
UseGlobalPoolsBooleanwhether or not to use a global thread pool for threads
ScheduledThreadPoolMaxSizeIntegerthe size of the scheduled thread pool
ThreadPoolMaxSizeIntegerthe size of the thread pool
SetupAttemptsIntegerNumber of attempts to setup a JMS connection (default is 10, -1 means to attempt infinitely). It is possible that the MDB is deployed before the JMS resources are available. In that case, the resource adapter will try to setup several times until the resources are available. This applies only for inbound connections
SetupIntervalLongInterval in milliseconds between consecutive attemps to setup a JMS connection (default is 2000m). This applies only for inbound connections

32.4.2. Adapter Outbound Configuration

The outbound configuration should remain unchanged as they define connection factories that are used by Java EE components. These Connection Factories can be defined inside a configuration file that matches the name *-ds.xml. You'll find a default jms-ds.xml configuration under the hornetq directory in the JBoss AS deployment. The connection factories defined in this file inherit their properties from the main ra.xml configuration but can also be overridden. The following example shows how to override them.

Note

Please note that this configuration only applies when HornetQ resource adapter is installed in JBoss Application Server. If you are using another JEE application server please refer to your application servers documentation for how to do this.

<tx-connection-factory>
      <jndi-name>RemoteJmsXA</jndi-name>
      <xa-transaction/>
      <rar-name>jms-ra.rar</rar-name>
      <connection-definition>org.hornetq.ra.HornetQRAConnectionFactory
</connection-definition>
      <config-property name="SessionDefaultType" type="String">javax.jms.Topic
      </config-property>
      <config-property name="ConnectorClassName" type="String">
        org.hornetq.core.remoting.impl.netty.NettyConnectorFactory
      </config-property>
      <config-property name="ConnectionParameters" type="String">
          port=5445</config-property>
      <max-pool-size>20</max-pool-size>
</tx-connection-factory>

In this example the connection factory will be bound to JNDI with the name RemoteJmsXA and can be looked up in the usual way using JNDI or defined within the EJB or MDB as such:

@Resource(mappedName="java:/RemoteJmsXA")
private ConnectionFactory connectionFactory;

The config-property elements are what overrides those in the ra.xml configuration file. Any of the elements pertaining to the connection factory can be overridden here.

The outbound configuration also defines additional properties in addition to the global configuration properties.

Table 32.2. Outbound Configuration Properties

Property NameProperty TypeProperty Description
SessionDefaultTypeStringthe default session type
UseTryLockIntegertry to obtain a lock within specified number of seconds. less than or equal to 0 disable this functionality

32.4.3. Adapter Inbound Configuration

The inbound configuration should again remain unchanged. This controls what forwards messages onto MDBs. It is possible to override properties on the MDB by adding an activation configuration to the MDB itself. This could be used to configure the MDB to consume from a different server.

The inbound configuration also defines additional properties in addition to the global configuration properties.

Table 32.3. Inbound Configuration Properties

Property NameProperty TypeProperty Description
DestinationStringJNDI name of the destination
DestinationTypeStringtype of the destination, either javax.jms.Queue or javax.jms.Topic (default is javax.jms.Queue)
AcknowledgeModeStringThe Acknowledgment mode, either Auto-acknowledge or Dups-ok-acknowledge (default is Auto-acknowledge). AUTO_ACKNOWLEDGE and DUPS_OK_ACKNOWLEDGE are acceptable values.
MaxSessionIntegerMaximum number of session created by this inbound configuration (default is 15)
MessageSelectorStringthe message selector of the consumer
SubscriptionDurabilityStringType of the subscription, either Durable or NonDurable
SubscriptionNameStringName of the subscription
TransactionTimeoutLongThe transaction timeout in milliseconds (default is 0, the transaction does not timeout)
UseJNDIBooleanWhether or not use JNDI to look up the destination (default is true)

32.4.4. Configuring the adapter to use a standalone HornetQ Server

Sometime you may want your messaging server on a different machine or separate from the application server. If this is the case you will only need the hornetq client libs installed. This section explains what config to create and what jar dependencies are needed.

There are two configuration files needed to do this, one for the incoming adapter used for MDB's and one for outgoing connections managed by the JCA managed connection pool used by outgoing JEE components wanting outgoing connections.

32.4.4.1.1. Configuring the Incoming Adaptor

Firstly you will need to create directory under the deploy directory ending in .rar. For this example we will name the directory hornetq-ra.rar. This detail is important as the name of directory is referred to by the MDB's and the outgoing configuration.

Note

The jboss default for this is jms-ra.rar, If you don't want to have to configure your MDB's you can use this but you may need to remove the generic adaptor that uses this.

Under the hornetq-ra.rar directory you will need to create a META-INF directory into which you should create an ra.xml configuration file. You can find a template for the ra.xml under the config directory of the HornetQ distribution.

To configure MDB's to consume messages from a remote HornetQ server you need to edit the ra.xml file under deploy/hornet-ra.rar/META-INF and change the transport type to use a netty connector (instead of the invm connector that is defined) and configure its transport params. Heres an example of what this would look like:

                   <resourceadapter-class>org.hornetq.ra.HornetQResourceAdapter</resourceadapter-class>
                   <config-property>
                   <description>The transport type</description>
                   <config-property-name>ConnectorClassName</config-property-name>
                   <config-property-type>java.lang.String</config-property-type>
                   <config-property-value>org.hornetq.core.remoting.impl.netty.NettyConnectorFactory</config-property-value>
                   </config-property>
                   <config-property>
                   <description>The transport configuration. These values must be in the form of key=val;key=val;</description>
                   <config-property-name>ConnectionParameters</config-property-name>
                   <config-property-type>java.lang.String</config-property-type>
                   <config-property-value>host=127.0.0.1;port=5446</config-property-value>
                   </config-property>
                

This configures the resource adapter to connect to a server running on localhost listening on port 5446

32.4.4.1.2. Configuring the outgoing adaptor

You will also need to configure the outbound connection by creating a hornetq-ds.xml and placing it under any directory that will be deployed under the deploy directory. In a standard HornetQ jboss configuration this would be under horneq or hornetq.sar but you can place it where ever you like. Actually as long as it ends in -ds.xml you can call it anything you like. You can again find a template for this file under the config directory of the HornetQ distribution but called jms-ds.xml which is the jboss default.

The following example shows a sample configuration

                   <tx-connection-factory>
                   <jndi-name>RemoteJmsXA</jndi-name>
                   <xa-transaction/>
                   <rar-name>hornetq-ra.rar</rar-name>
                   <connection-definition>org.hornetq.ra.HornetQRAConnectionFactory</connection-definition>
                   <config-property name="SessionDefaultType" type="java.lang.String">javax.jms.Topic</config-property>
                   <config-property name="ConnectorClassName" type="java.lang.String">org.hornetq.core.remoting.impl.netty.NettyConnectorFactory</config-property>
                   <config-property name="ConnectionParameters" type="java.lang.String">host=127.0.0.1;port=5446</config-property>
                   <max-pool-size>20</max-pool-size>
                   </tx-connection-factory>
                

Again you will see that this uses the netty connector type and will connect to the HornetQ server running on localhost and listening on port 5446. JEE components can access this by using JNDI and looking up the connection factory using JNDI using java:/RemoteJmsXA, you can see that this is defined under thejndi-name attribute. You will also note that the outgoing connection will be created by the resource adaptor configured under the directory hornetq-ra.rar as explained in the last section.

32.4.4.1.3. Jar dependencies

This is a list of the HornetQ and third party jars needed

Table 32.4. Jar Dependencies

Jar NameDescriptionLocation
hornetq-ra.jarThe HornetQ resource adaptor classesdeploy/hornetq-ra.rar or equivelant
hornetq-core-client.jarThe HornetQ core client classeseither in the config lib, i.e. default/lib or the common lib dir, i.e. $JBOSS_HOME/common lib
hornetq-jms-client.jarThe HornetQ JMS classesas above
netty.jarThe Netty transport classesas above

32.5. High Availability JNDI (HA-JNDI)

If you are using JNDI to look-up JMS queues, topics and connection factories from a cluster of servers, it is likely you will want to use HA-JNDI so that your JNDI look-ups will continue to work if one or more of the servers in the cluster fail.

HA-JNDI is a JBoss Application Server service which allows you to use JNDI from clients without them having to know the exact JNDI connection details of every server in the cluster. This service is only available if using a cluster of JBoss Application Server instances.

To use it use the following properties when connecting to JNDI.

Hashtable<String, String> jndiParameters = new Hashtable<String, String>();
jndiParameters.put("java.naming.factory.initial", 
    "org.jnp.interfaces.NamingContextFactory");
jndiParameters.put("java.naming.factory.url.pkgs=", 
    "org.jboss.naming:org.jnp.interfaces");

initialContext = new InitialContext(jndiParameters);

For more information on using HA-JNDI see the JBoss Application Server clustering documentation

32.6. XA Recovery

XA recovery deals with system or application failures to ensure that of a transaction are applied consistently to all resources affected by the transaction, even if any of the application processes or the machine hosting them crash or lose network connectivity. For more information on XA Recovery,please refer to JBoss Transactions.

When HornetQ is integrated with JBoss AS, it can take advantage of JBoss Transactions to provide recovery of messaging resources. If messages are involved in a XA transaction, in the event of a server crash, the recovery manager will ensure that the transactions are recovered and the messages will either be committed or rolled back (depending on the transaction outcome) when the server is restarted.

32.6.1. XA Recovery Configuration

To enable HornetQ's XA Recovery, the Recovery Manager must be configured to connect to HornetQ to recover its resources. The following property must be added to the jta section of conf/jbossts-properties.xml of JBoss AS profiles:

<properties depends="arjuna" name="jta">
   ...
                     
   <property name="com.arjuna.ats.jta.recovery.XAResourceRecovery.HornetQ1"
                value="org.hornetq.jms.server.recovery.HornetQXAResourceRecovery;[connection configuration]"/>
</properties>
            

The [connection configuration] contains all the information required to connect to HornetQ node under the form [connector factory class name],[user name], [password], [connector parameters].

  • [connector factory class name] corresponds to the name of the ConnectorFactory used to connect to HornetQ. Values can be org.hornetq.core.remoting.impl.invm.InVMConnectorFactory or org.hornetq.core.remoting.impl.netty.NettyConnectorFactory

  • [user name] is the user name to create a client session. It is optional

  • [password] is the password to create a client session. It is mandatory only if the user name is specified

  • [connector parameters] is a list of comma-separated key=value pair which are passed to the connector factory (see Chapter 16, Configuring the Transport for a list of the transport parameters).

Note

HornetQ must have a valid acceptor which corresponds to the connector specified in conf/jbossts-properties.xml.

32.6.1.1. Configuration Settings

If HornetQ is configured with a default in-vm acceptor:

<acceptor name="in-vm">
    <factory-class>org.hornetq.core.remoting.impl.invm.InVMAcceptorFactory</factory-class>
</acceptor>
                

the corresponding configuration in conf/jbossts-properties.xml is:

<property name="com.arjuna.ats.jta.recovery.XAResourceRecovery.HORNETQ1"
   value="org.hornetq.jms.server.recovery.HornetQXAResourceRecovery;org.hornetq.core.remoting.impl.invm.InVMConnectorFactory"/>        			
                

If it is now configured with a netty acceptor on a non-default port:

<acceptor name="netty">
    <factory-class>org.hornetq.core.remoting.impl.netty.NettyAcceptorFactory</factory-class>
    <param key="port" value="8888"/>
</acceptor>
                

the corresponding configuration in conf/jbossts-properties.xml is:

<property name="com.arjuna.ats.jta.recovery.XAResourceRecovery.HORNETQ1"
       value="org.hornetq.jms.server.recovery.HornetQXAResourceRecovery;org.hornetq.core.remoting.impl.netty.NettyConnectorFactory, , , port=8888"/>        			                    
                

Note

Note the additional commas to skip the user and password before connector parameters

If the recovery must use admin, adminpass, the configuration would have been:

                    <property name="com.arjuna.ats.jta.recovery.XAResourceRecovery.HORNETQ1"
                           value="org.hornetq.jms.server.recovery.HornetQXAResourceRecovery;org.hornetq.core.remoting.impl.netty.NettyConnectorFactory, admin, adminpass, port=8888"/>        			                    
                

Configuring HornetQ with an invm acceptor and configuring the Recovery Manager with an invm connector is the recommended way to enable XA Recovery.

32.6.2. Example

See Section 11.3.9, “XA Recovery” which shows how to configure XA Recovery and recover messages after a server crash.